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MEFL rebrands as Australian Energy Foundation

Moreland Energy Foundation has been working towards an equitable zero carbon society for almost 20 years, and as the organisation continues to scale up and expand their service offerings, their name change recognises the national footprint of their operations and impact.

Travis Neal, Chair of the Board of Directors for the newly-branded Australian Energy Foundation said “this transformation aligns with the organisation’s ability to partner with all levels of government and like-minded organisations nationally to tackle climate change and energy poverty.”

The majority of Australian adults now see climate change as ‘a critical threat’(1) and more than 240,000 Australians currently experiencing the tough realities of energy poverty, there is an urgency to act and lead in developing pathways to the solutions.

Alison Rowe, Australian Energy Foundation CEO, says “our role in Australia has never been more important, and with our new positioning, we are ready to face the issues of energy poverty and the climate emergency head on.”

Having already prevented 330,000 tonnes of carbon emissions in the past 6 years alone, through their renewable energy and energy efficiency programs, the AEF plans to increase the reach of their impact by establishing partnerships with state and local government and community groups beyond their current relationships.

Already partnering with 24 councils in VIC and NSW, it’s clear that while Moreland is their home, the AEF has impacted many residents beyond Moreland’s boundary while known as MEFL before their name-change took place. They are already recognised for their strengths and expertise in creating and implementing innovative solutions to demonstrate clear pathways to the energy transition.

One of those initiatives enables local councils to offer their residents access to the AEF’s free energy advice service from the energy experts at Positive Charge, a sub-brand of the organisation. Members of the community are linked with carefully selected suppliers and access to high quality products from solar panels and batteries, to air conditioning and heat pumps, with plans to further expand their product and service offerings in the near future.

And through their work with several State Government departments and various community and social agencies the AEF have delivered significant projects for those who don’t have access to choose their own renewable energy solutions.

One example was their Cooling Communities project in partnership with Aboriginal Housing Victoria, which provided energy efficiency upgrades to social housing to improve residents health and comfort during the extreme heat of Australia’s summers.

While there’s still lots more to do in NSW and VIC, the close to 40 strong (and growing) team at the Australian Energy Foundation are poised and ready to roll-out their successful Zero Carbon Services, Community Energy and home and business upgrade programs into QLD and SA, with initial feasibility studies for some projects already completed.

“We’ll be right at the forefront of making sure no one is left behind in the energy transition,” says Alison, “and we’ll continue our work to create an equitable zero carbon society across ALL of Australia.”

If you would like to find out more about the organisation, visit AEF.com.au

 

1 – 2019 Lowy Institute poll – Australian attitudes climate change